Plagiarism II

In November of 2008 MckMama posted a photography tutorial about ISO on her site. However the words were not her own; they had been written more than a year earlier by someone else.

Example 1
Posted on November 19, 2008 by MckMama:

As you may or may not recall from the days of film cameras, film comes in a variety of speeds. Film speed is measured using a numbering system called ISO. Lower ISO numbers are indicative of slow films, which are less sensitive to light, while higher ISO numbers are more sensitives to light. It’s pretty typical to shoot with ISO 100 or 200 in normal daylight, and use 400 film for lower light photography. Super-fast films like ISO 800 and even ISO 1600 are available for photography in hear darkness.
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Posted on April 10th, 2007 on other site:

As you might recall from the days of film cameras, film comes in a variety of speeds. Film speed is measured using a numbering system called ISO (sometimes also referred to by its geezer name, ASA). Lower ISO numbers are known as “slow” films, which are less sensitive to light, while higher ISO numbers are more sensitive to light. It’s pretty typical to shoot with ISO 100 or 200 in normal daylight, and use 400 film for lower light photography. Super-fast films like ISO 800 and even ISO 1600 are available for photography in near darkness.
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Example 2
Posted on November 19, 2008 by MckMama:

Lucky for you (And me!) you can control the sensitivity of your camera’s light sensor by changing the camera’s ISO setting. By default, most digital cameras have an ISO somewhere around 100. If you need more film speed for low light conditions, getting more sensitivity out of your camera is as simple as selecting a higher ISO from the camera’s menu. Most digital cameras offer a range of ISO values, such as 100, 200, and 400.
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Posted on April 10th, 2007 on other site:

As it happens, you can control the sensitivity of your camera’s light sensor by chaging the camera’s ISO setting. By default, most digital cameras have an ISO somewhere around 100. If you need more film speed for low light conditions, getting more sensitivity out of your camera is as simple as selecting a higher ISO from the camera’s menu. Most digital cameras offer a range of ISO values, such as 100, 200, and 400.
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Example 3
Posted on November 19, 2008 by MckMama:

That sounds great, right? And I know what you’re thinking: “MckMama, if higher ISO film is more light sensitive, why not always use a higher ISO number?”
I’ll tell you why not.
You see, dear friends, light sensitivity brings its own baggage. High speed film was notoriously grainy. As you increased film’s sensitivity to light, the light-sensitive grains of silver in the film emulsion got bigger and more noticeable. In the final print, that manifested itself as grainy, pixely (is pixely a word!?) elements in the photo that took away the photo’s smooth, high-resolution look. Ironically, in the world of digital, almost exactly the same effect is present. Increasing the sensitivity of the camera’s light sensor introduces digital noise into the picture. Similar to film grain, noise is random pixels of color scattered on your photograph.
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Posted on April 10th, 2007 on other site:

That sounds great, right? So I know what you’re thinking: If higher ISO film is more light sensitive, why not always use a high ISO number?
Unfortunately, light sensitivity brings its own baggage. High speed film was notoriously grainy. As you increased the film’s sensitivity to light, the light-sensitive grains of silver halide in the film emulsion got bigger and more noticeable. In the final print, the manifested itself as grain-irregular, pixel-like elements in the photo that took away the photo’s smooth, high-resolution look. Ironically, in the world of digital, we have almost exactly the same effect when choosing ISO values. Increasing the sensitivity of the camera’s light sensor introduces digital noise into the picture. Similar to film grain noise is random pixels of color.
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Example 4
Posted on November 19, 2008 by MckMama:

To illustrate this, let me show you that may not notice noise from a distance.
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and

. . . you can actually see the noise. It’s hard to miss the grainy look of this photo, complete with zillions of specks of color. All digital images have some amount of noise; there is simply no getting away from it. But it gets worse as the ISO . . .
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Posted on April 10th, 2007 on other site:

You may not notice noise from a distance, but if you zoom in on a digital photo on the computer screen or look closely at a print, it’s hard to miss. All digital images have some amount of noise, but it gets worse as the ISO goes up. Check out the small detail of a high-ISO photo, for instance. The noise-appearing in the form of colored speckles-is quite apparent.
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Example 5
Posted on November 19, 2008 by MckMama:

“So what should I do about ISO?” Great question, again! I suggest shooting at the lowest possible ISO all the time. In ordinary shooting conditions, stick with the camera’s lowest ISO level, since that’ll give you the least digital nose. But when you notice that your camera is recommending a really slow shutter speed, or your photos are starting to look blurry and hazy when you don’t use a flash, then just crank up the ISO. But don’t forget to drop it back down to the lower value when you’re done, so you don’t accidentally capture a month’s worth of pictures at ISO 800.

Another thing to keep in mind is that your digital cameras is not likely to allow you to adjust the ISO when you’re in the camera’s automatic mode (Which is quite possibly the mode you are used to shooting in.). To tweak the ISO, you’ll need to be in program, shutter priority, aperture priority, or a scene mode.
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Posted on April 10th, 2007 on other site:

So what should you do about ISO? I suggest shooting at the lowest possible ISO all the time. In ordinary shooting conditions, stick with the camera’s lowest ISO level, since that’ll give you the least digital noise. But when you notice that the camera is recommending a really slow shutter speed, crank up the ISO. Just remember to drop it back down to the lower value when you’re done, so you don’t accidentally capture a month’s worth of pictures at ISO 800.

Another thing to keep in mind: most digital cameras don’t allow you to adjust the ISO (or any other setting for that matter) when you’re in Automatic exposure mode. To tweak the ISO, you’ll want to be in Program, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority or a Scene mode.
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